Annapolis | Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts

Annapolis

Interview conducted by Gallery Director, Sigrid Trumpy.

What’s your earliest memory of art?

Art was always a part of my academic life starting in the second grade with life-like paper mache animals and musical instruments. I still remember vividly the experience of creating them.  In our free time my sister and I would create paper mosaic pictures and paintings with glitter and collage.  By age nine, I won an award for an abstract painting.  

When I was 14, my friend’s mom tacked a sheet to her kitchen wall. With a bucket of black paint, and a bucket of white, she handed me house-painting brushes and said “Paint!”  I never felt freer in my life.  Though I didn’t know the Abstract Expressionists at the time, you might look at those huge paintings – rough as they were - and say that Franz Kline was whispering in one ear, and Robert Motherwell in the other. I continued with art in high school, college, and beyond, but didn’t think of it as a career until many years later.

What projects are you working on at the moment?

I work on numerous projects simultaneously.  My inspirations come in such floods that if I don’t start something when I am feeling it, it will dissipate into the ethers.  Out of the 20 to 30 ideas that hit me on any given day, those that get my full focus and take hold are ones that promise to be visually exciting or meaningful in a positive way.  

Right now I am focused on creating large abstract works free from the confines of a specific theme.  My current exhibit, “Balanced Distractions” is a collection of paintings that reflect a variety of moods, from dynamic movement to quiet reflection to multi-layered collage paintings with multiple interpretations. 

Another direction I am pursuing is a series called “Coffee and Conversations with…”, which started with “Coffee and Conversations with Franz K. and Robert M.”  This 48” x 48” painting is an abstract-collage suggesting coffee through the use of color and texture, and I’ve collaged in text and pictures the topics I would want to discuss if I were lucky enough to conversation over coffee with these two iconic American Abstract Expressionists.  I’m now having fun making a list of the people – past and present – with whom I’d love to have a conversation over coffee.

To balance out the large paintings, I work on small pieces such as abstract landscapes or animals.  I’ve retired my songbird series, and I will start a new animal series of African animals, starting with cheetahs.  

I am also working on the illustrations for my book “Shannon, the Magic Carpet Dog,” based on my own precious Chow/American Eskimo.

When you work, do you love the process or the result?

I don’t think I could paint if I didn’t enjoy the process.  I’m not saying I haven’t had moments of complete and utter frustration, and wanting to give up on a piece.  More than once I’ve had to gesso over or even discard a canvas during the development of a commissioned painting because the direction went south.  It goes awry because I get focused on the result.  Once I settle in and let the painting unfold organically, it becomes a rewarding experience, and I am ultimately happy with the result.  

How do you know when a work is finished?

A few paintings flow from start to finish with a definite conclusion.  With most works however, the only way I can be sure it is finished is to step away from it completely for at least three days.  Then when I see it again it’s like seeing it for the first time, and if something still needs resolution it pops out immediately, like there is a bright spotlight and an arrow pointing to it saying, “Fix me!”  Then I fix it – and that’s when I know I’m done.

Which artists do you most admire?  Why are they your role models?

The list of artists whose work inspires me is pages long.  I love the chiaroscuro of Caravaggio, the energy of Van Gogh, and the playfulness and fabulous colors of Wayne Thiebaud.  I am the most passionate about the American Abstract Expressionists, both in terms of their work and their courage to pave a path that helped the world see art differently.  Love it or hate it, the dialogue continues to this day.  

I am specifically drawn to the art of Sam Francis and Robert Motherwell– I think because I feel a kinship to the positive energy that underlies their work.   

Among artists I know, I have to single out my mentor, Tesia Blackburn.  A San Francisco abstract artist and Golden Paint Working Artist, she is an incredible role model.  Her work is pure and uplifting.  It comes from the soul, and she has true integrity in her art and in her generous spirit of teaching.

Is a creative dialogue important to you and if so, how do you find it and with whom?

Being an artist is a solitary endeavor. I am also a writer, which is another introverted activity.  As an almost extreme extrovert, it is critical for me to not only have the social interaction, but to have meaningful and informative discussions about all things art:  history, art events, trends, new artists, and what is going on in both the local and global art communities. 

To feed my soul and stay continuously refreshed, I maintain art connections in San Francisco, New York, Maine, and metro Washington, DC.  Social media, Art News Magazine and the NY Times Art Section online help me stay current.  I am involved as a volunteer with MFA that has a membership of more 425, and I stay in close touch with the art galleries in town.  I love curating exhibits, because pulling together other artists’ works in a collection is yet another way to view the art. The most exciting way for me to stay connected is meeting artists, experiencing their studios, and getting immersed in exhibits at galleries and museums.  There’s nothing like starting your day with one way of looking at the world, then experiencing someone else’s art and viewing the world through a new lens.  Fabulous.

What is your creative ambition?

My ambition stems from my reason for painting:  I paint to experience and create joy.  Much like my writing, the real goal is that I articulate the message clearly; that a painting truly reflects what I am feeling when I create it.  So what is my ambition?  My goal is to continue to explore new methods and techniques of creating art in the soulful endeavor of bringing pleasure to others.  My best days are when someone sees my work and says, “This is such joyful work!”

I envision some day having my own exhibition space with inspiring views and positive environment for art workshops.  It will probably not be traditional; the vision is still forming.  Bottom line?  To always be involved in the making of, and the writing about art, however it evolves.

What are the obstacles to this ambition?

I’ve learned through experience that the only real obstacle is a resistance to change.  All the other things we encounter are only challenges to be dealt with.  Where there is a will, there is a way.  I may have to take a detour, but I never give up on the destination.  And when I reach it, I’ll set another.

 

For more information about Patrice, visit her Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

Explore all that Maryland Hall has to offer at our annual Open House on Sunday, March 22 from 1-4 pm! From performances to art demonstrations, hands-on projects to gallery events, this FREE event will be an exciting afternoon full of fun and creativity for children and adults. Below is a schedule of activities happening by floor. All activities are from 1 - 4 pm unless otherwise noted. 

ArtFest 2015 Schedule

Main Stage Performances

1 – 2 pm: Maple School of Irish Dance
2 – 3 pm: Annapolis Musical Theater
3 – 4 pm: Peabody Harp Ensemble

First Floor

Annapolis Musical Theatre Rehearsal (1 – 2 pm), Room 101
Peabody: Guitar Performance & “Petting Zoo” (2 – 3 pm), Room 101A
Hawaiian Dance (1 – 2 pm), Room 102
Ballroom Dancing (2 – 4 pm), Room 102
Face Painting (1 – 3 pm), Alcove Gallery
Annapolis Ice Cream, Room 110
Pottery Demonstration, Room 112
Pottery ‘Seconds Sale’, Room 114
Woodturning Demonstration, Room 119
Glass Demonstration, Room 117A
Felt & Bead Hands-on Activity, Room 117B
Etching Demonstration, Room 117C

Second Floor

Peabody: Early Childhood Music Class (1 – 2 pm), Room 201
Peabody: Voice Performance (2 – 3 pm), Room 201
Peabody: Guitar Performance & “Petting Zoo” (3 – 4 pm), Room 201
Children’s Hands-on Crafts, Room 205
HERE. a pop-up shop (10 am – 6 pm), Room 211
Paper Mache and Printmaking Demonstration, Room 212
Gouache Demonstration (1 – 3 pm), Room 212
Pastel Still Life Demonstrations (1 – 3:15 pm), Room 213
Drawing & Painting Dog Portraits Demonstration, Room 214
Clock Maker Demonstration, Chaney Gallery
Celtic Jam (1 – 2 pm), Martino Gallery

Third Floor

Face Painting (1 – 3 pm), Room 300
Belly Dancing (2:30 – 4 pm), Room 301
Popcorn, Room 303 
Ballet Theatre of Maryland, Room 306
Annapolis Film Festival, Room 308
Artist-in-Residence Open Studios, Room 305, 310, 312, 314

In the Galleries

Nature/Nurture: The Paintings of Father and Daughter by Peter Egeli and Lisa Egeli, Chaney Gallery
Balanced Distraction by Patrice Drago, Martino Gallery
Inside + Outside, Art by Ruth Connell, Balcony Gallery

 

Part of the city-wide celebration of Maryland Day.
Thanks to Severn Town Club and Annapolis Ice Cream for their support.

Father/daughter duo Peter and Lisa Egeli held a gallery talk on March 11 for their exhibition "Nature/Nurture: The Paintings of Father and Daughter" on display in the Chaney Gallery. The gallery talk was well attended and a number of their paintings have already sold. If you have the opportunity to, stop by and check out their exhibition along with Patrice Drago's and Ruth Connell's also on display at Maryland Hall through April 11.  Ruth Connell will be hosting a gallery talk on Wednesday, April 8 at 5:30 pm.

Photos courtesy of Patrick O'Brien - www.PatrickOBrienStudio.com

I have found painting plein air with artist friends is what I enjoy most. I am sad that I will no longer be able to paint with Bonnie Roth Anderson. We last painted a year ago in Bristol Rhode Island.   Diane Carey Thomson, Marion LeMoal, Bonnie and I stayed at the summer home of artist Janice Antinucci. Here is a painting and sketch in the area where we painted together.  At the end of the day Bonnie would critique our paintings.  She was a great teacher and we all  learned so much from her.  I also took her portrait class and hope to paint my grandchildren with the skills she taught me.  Such a loss for the art community.

Marshes (above) was an earlier Cape Cod painting that Bonnie purchased... the highest compliment is when another artist buys your painting.

Above are pictures of memorable places painted en plein air (L-R): Georgia O'Keeffe home in Abiquiu, Giverny, France and trees in Taos, New Mexico.

 

For more information about Merla, visit her Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

I have chosen my Christmas Amaryllis to show the progress of creating a painting.  I have it set up in my studio and I have taped a large piece of paper and use blue tape to crop where I am going to paint.

 

I put out fresh paint on plates that serve as my palette, and lots of water that I replace often to keep colors clean and fresh. Next: I do a quick sketch of my subject to define some colors and composition.

 

I usually start painting on the paper with colors and do not start with a detailed pencil sketch. On the right is after two hours of painting. The painting is finished and I will show you how I keep adding to the flower.

 

As I continue I keep defining and adding detail to he painting.  

 

I have finished the painting or I should say I have stopped.  That is the key to water color, knowing when to stop.   I added a light background to surround the flower.  I look at my sketch and loose design with pen & ink. It  is more  the feeling I want to convey of this flower. I can add ink or strong pencil line that can be washed to create more of the a linear feeling.

Many artists are not satisfied with the progress of a piece of art.

My Amaryllis is gone,the petals have dropped.   I can start it again on a new piece of paper,  I will not use photos, but reference the painting and the sketch I have.  

I hear my muse speaking to my art soul "it is just a piece of paper".

 

For more information about Merla, visit her Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every Monday for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

 

Maryland Hall presents the world famous Comedy Pet Theater on Friday, March 20 at 7:30 pm. This family-oriented theatrical circus is a blend of unique physical comedy, starring Gregory Popovich and the extraordinary talents of his rescued performing pets. Tickets are $26 for Non-Members; $21 for Maryland Hall members and $17 for children. Click here to purchase tickets.

Internationally-acclaimed award winner, Gregory Popovich, is the producer and star of the show along with his entourage of 30 rescued furry four-legged performers. Popovich has won numerous juggling awards and is known as one of the top three best jugglers of the world. Currently, he holds the world record in a balancing/juggling feat in which he stands atop a nine-foot free standing ladder and juggles nine rings.

During the show, audiences will witness acts such as the Dog Classroom, the Amazing House-Cats, the Animal Train Station and so much more. Surprise appearances by more animal performers, including trained doves, parrots, goats and even a miniature horse named Diamond, along with acrobats, mimes, contortionists and jaw dropping juggling by Popovich.

Popovich is a lifelong advocate of animal rights. All pets that perform in Comedy Pet Theater are rescues from shelters — and serve as furry ambassadors for animals seeking homes. “When people see these amazing, healthy animals on stage and decide to adopt an animal from a shelter themselves, my main message has reached the audience,” says Popovich. Popovich is a master animal trainer who employs positive-reinforcement techniques in his training — coaching individual animals to perform tasks based on their natural habits. He has shared his expertise for raising, training and living harmoniously with pets in two books: “You CAN Train Your Cat: Secrets of a Master Cat Trainer,” and “Doggy Gone Good: A Master’s Guide to Teaching Manners, Tricks and Healthy Habits.”

Click the video below to see a preview of Gregory Popovich and his pets in action. 

Maryland Hall invites all 2D abstract artists to apply for the ALL ABSTRACT exhibition that will be on display from May 13 - July 11. Artworks limited only by your imagination. Explore color, movement, form and other intangibles that are not dependent on a recognizable subject.

Works up to 44” are eligible for this exhibit where one artwork will be displayed by each artist and can be a painting, drawing, print or collage. No sculpture or photography. Works on paper must be framed and ready for hanging. All works must have hanging wires. No saw tooth hangers will be allowed. Delivery of artworks is Monday, May 11 from 10-5. Works will be exhibited from May 13 – July 11 on Maryland Hall's 2nd floor hallway panels. There will be an opening reception on Thursday, May 14 from 5:30 - 7 pm. Please note, this is not a juried exhibit. 

Submit one image with the following information to strumpy@mdhallarts.org. Please include name, address, email, phone number, title of artwork, size, medium or technique, price or NFS.  The last day to apply is April 15. 

Image: Cassandra Kabler, Summer News, 2010, 31 x 22.5, watercolor. 

Maryland Hall presents an evening of traditional and contemporary folk music at a performance titled “Birds of a Feather” featuring Magpie and Shenandoah Run on Saturday, March 14 at 7:30 pm. Tickets are $26 for Non-Members and $21 for Maryland Hall members. Noted folk music radio host Mary Cliff will be the emcee for the evening. Click here to purchase tickets.

The concert will feature a range of folk music from classic hits by Pete Seeger, Tom Paxton and Joan Baez and music inspired by the Civil War, the civil rights movement and the environment. The show’s unique format allows the groups to perform separately throughout the night and then come together at the end for a special performance.

Since 1973, Magpie, the NY-based duo of Terry Leonino and Greg Artzner, have brought their unique sound and remarkable versatility to diverse audiences. They perform traditional songs, vintage blues, swing and country as well as folk classics and stirring original compositions. With two strong voices in harmony and superb instrumental arrangements on guitars, mandolin, harmonica, dulcimer and concertina, their sound is powerful and moving. Award-winning recording artists, songwriters, musical historians, and social activists, Magpie always promise a presentation that is highly entertaining as well as provocative and deeply moving. Joining Magpie for the night is bass player Ralph Gordon.

Regional favorite, Shenandoah Run is a folk group made up of nine members, hand-picked for his or her individual musicality, vocal and instrumental talent, and a strong desire to keep folk music alive and fresh. Their repertoire features the songs and sounds of American folk, country, and bluegrass music, with the occasional infusion of songs from other lands. Their blend of vintage and contemporary folk music, treated with lush harmonies and skillful instrumental backing, defines their signature recognizable sound. With their many years of collective performance experience, they produce arrangements that are fresh, varied, and unique, and deliver them in a manner that delights audiences of all ages. Their relaxed and informal presentation quickly establishes a rapport with the audience and encourages them to sing along.

Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence Merla Tootle takes you on a tour of her studio in Studio 305.

Studio 305 divides into 3 studios. Enter the main door  and  come around to the 2nd entry  to the far left and you will be in my studio.  The wall holds a small gallery of my paintings.   Next you will see a still life set up and a tabouret with oil brushes and supplies. 

 

1) My art altar displays my plants and décor.  It is focus in my studio. I have a strong  Asian influence in my art. 2) The bookcase holds a variety of supplies;  brushes, different paints, oils to pastel.  Necessary items are mediums, cleaners, art books and periodicals.

 

 

On the wall next to shelves hangs a large oil painting from college, a study in color planes .  I have my carry-on suit case available ; always ready  to travel to paint to my next plein air destination. Adjacent is  hand painted watercolor chart.  Someday I will frame the chart as a work of art.  

 

My watercolor table set up, brushes and water... the dark handled  brush on the paper is irreplaceable.  It is a handmade squirrel brush from a craftsman, “The Brushman,” who is  no longer making brushes.

 

The last wall is all windows….I use part of the ledge to hold older oils that  I painted while studying with John Ebersberger.    I learned how to see color and the importance of light how it defines shape.   Light is the narrator of a painting.

 

1) A larger view looking out my window wall.   These windows are my source of wonderful  light and I have a view of MD Hall’s new refurbished windows. 2) My window sill serves as an extra shelf. Vincent Van Gogh is one my favorite painters and Picasso is always lurking in the background as my abstract influence. 3) “Namaste” My wooden manikin in the foreground of  my impressionist  landscape painting.  It will appear it various places as my “elf on the shelf”

 

Sitting at my work table for water colors, but I never paint sitting down.   You need to put your whole body into a painting.

 

Looking at my wall of unfinished paintings, statements of color, and calligraphy words to inspire.

 

1) Working on oil painting from still life using the brush for small detail. 2) At the easel with the palette knife.

 

Travel Sketch book with paints, brush  and carrier.   With these items  I have journaled my travels for  the last few years.  Up the coast of California, from San Diego to San Francisco. Also Yosemite,  further on to Canada and  Alaska. On the East coast, locally, and  north to Rhode Island, Cape Cod and Maine.

 

The method used is gesso and a pallete  knife on canvas. The winter scene totally painted with the knife.  The  other; flowers are partially  painted  with brush and knife. This can be  joy  for a watercolorist; the canvas can be mounted and sprayed and framed without a mat or  glass.  

 

 

For more information about Merla, visit her Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every Monday for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

Interview conducted by Gallery Director, Sigrid Trumpy.

Where would you like to start?

I will start with  a description of my art materials. I am a painter and recently, it's been almost 10 years , I became a watercolorist. So my tools that I use are paint, either oil or watercolor and brushes; but I found that I like to use the palette knife. I learned to use the palette knife with oil and then I learned how to use it with watercolors.

How do you use a palette knife with watercolors?

I was taught that you can mix gesso with watercolor and you spread it just like oil paints. It has a very slick consistency so that you can use it with a palette knife.

Why do you prefer watercolor to oil or acrylic?

I was quite surprised that I would enjoy it.  I took watercolor as a student and I hated it. It always became muddy & just was a mess. Over the years I found it was my impatience with the medium  that made it so hard to be successful. Years later I have now attempted watercolor, I have a different attitude on life and painting now. I have found with watercolor I'm able to be very expressive about what I am painting. I will usually paint flowers but also enjoy painting landscapes.

What is your earliest memory of art?

I remember when I was in second grade my teacher came to me and asked me to be part of the mural painting that they were doing for the school. It was all grades and I felt really special that I was chosen to be part of this special project.

Obviously that was a very pleasurable experience for you as a child. Did you continue to create throughout your elementary and high school years?

I was always painting or sketching. I was an only child and spent a lot of time with adults so in that time I always chose to draw.  I always took art classes through elementary, junior high and high school and then decided to continue and major in art in college.

So you've been making art almost your whole life. Who is your muse and why?

 I actually found my muse right here in Maryland Hall. . I had a demanding job and painting in oils consumed too much time.  I decided to take a watercolor class and change my direction. I knew Erika Walsh from where I worked in the art gallery and I admired her work. I met her while she was still living in Germany and came to deliver work and always enjoyed seeing what was in that portfolio she carried. She opened a new world to me.  I find her a total inspiration, for her strength and her teaching ability to appreciate watercolor. As I said I had a very dissatisfying attitude towards watercolor but Erika changed that totally and now I find watercolor is what I prefer to create with.  Through Erika I learned not to obsess with the painting, but paint loose and fast. Just let the painting develop.  As my muse one of her favorite phrases comes to me “it's just a sheet of paper”.

What is your ideal creative activity?

I have enjoyed and have had the opportunity to paint en plein air with my artist friends. I've traveled to France and many places in the US and Mexico.  I find it inspiring to paint with other artists and painting plein air is always better than painting from a photograph. I have been blessed that I have painted in Giverny with the gardeners. I applied to paint on the day that only artists are allowed to paint in the garden and spent the whole day with two other artist friends. It was like Monet was there with me.

The other opportunity I had recently was that I went to Abiquiu, New Mexico to see the George O'Keeffe home and her art. There was a seminar coming up for a limit of six people where we could paint at her home.

What did the seminar include?

We were asked if we preferred to paint in the morning or afternoon. Morning painting consisted of getting up and being at the pick-up spot ready to go at 6:30 am. I knew that I could do that. I wanted to be up and out at her home. We were not actually allowed to paint in the house or the courtyard where her famous door painting was done, but we painted on the grounds. It was not a class but just an opportunity for you to paint and envision and be there and see what she painted. The class ended with lunch.

Also another amenity to this class was  we went into her bomb shelter that is not part of the tour. She was an amazing woman. She had planned a total bomb shelter for her staff and her to be able to live if there was ever anything you need to be protected from. I do not regret painting early in the morning because the afternoon class was all thunderstorms which are so typical of that area.  I had talked to the curator earlier and he recommended painting in the morning and he was right.

What are you working on at the moment?

I am looking forward to having a show here in Maryland Hall in September. I have to go through the decision process of what to paint.  I know t's going to be a watercolor exhibit.  It will be with nature because flowers and landscapes are what I love to paint and I have to somehow combine my love for abstract painting.

L-R: Infiniti, Pansy Orchid, Sea Nettles.

 

For more information about Merla, visit her Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every Monday for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

 

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