Inside the Hall: Maryland Hall News Blog

Maryland Hall is participating in this year’s Annapolis Arts Week

 A week-long celebration of the Arts


Join us on Saturday, June 3rd from 4 - 7 pm for a district-wide kick-off block party! Park at Maryland Hall and experience gallery exhibitions, family-friendly crafts, and artists-in-residence open studios. Enjoy art demonstrations by multiple Maryland Hall artists and instructors. Beer and wine will be available for purchase before you make your way to Gallery Row on West Street!

Beer and Wine for Sale | 2nd Floor

RAFFLE - Enter for a chance to win artwork by our Artists-in-Residence c.l.bigelow, mixed media sculptor, and Elizabeth Kendall, ceramic artist. Proceeds will be donated to Maryland Hall's Scholarship Fund which enables students to take classes for free or at reduced fees throughout the year. This program helps us keep the arts accessible to all our community's students. For more information on our scholarship program click here.

1 ticket $10 | 3 tickets $25

Open Studios: Woodturning,Glass fusing, Ceramics | 1st floor

Art Demonstrations by Artists-in-Residence Patrice Drago and Elizabeth Kendall and  Maryland Hall Portrait Co-op 

Family Friendly Crafts | Chaney Gallery

 

Don’t forget to come to our FREE Summer concert, Eastport Oyster Boys on Thursday, June 8th at 6:30 pm and the closing reception for the Yumi Hogan, Freedom of Nature exhibit, Saturday, June 10 from 2 - 3:30 pm.

 

This year's Comcast Cares Day was a great success! 

Friends and families spent the day doing some gardening at Maryland Hall! Helped clean up the grounds, laid mulch and stone and did a little landscaping and it was greatly appreciated!

Thank you to all who came out and helped keep the grounds at Maryland Hall looking their best. 

Follow the link below and watch the video to see what a great contribution Comcast Cares Day is to Maryland Hall and the community.

https://sproutvideo.com/videos/489ad8b61a18e4c4c0

 

Maryland Hall is partnering with  BIG INK, for two one-day large woodcut printing sessions on August 4 & 5th. It's important to note you don't have to be a printmaker in order to apply. If you can draw, you should submit an application to this very unique opportunity.

Click here to view the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts Prospectus, Annapolis, MD

BIG INK brings together artists, community organizations, and the public to produce large scale black and white woodcuts for exhibition and educational purposes. Artists from the US and abroad submit a proposal to create a big print through their website. Print studios offer their facilities so artists may collaboratively print the work while museums and galleries mount exhibitions of the finished pieces. The project was initiated in 2012 by Lyell Castonguay and his partner Carand to share their acquired knowledge of working large.

 

At Maryland Hall, we’ll be utilizing BIG INK’s giant 48” x 96” mobile etching press to pull prints. Accepted artists will have two months prior to the event to carve their image into a piece of plywood. BIG INK remains in contact with each participant providing guidance and technical support when needed. Artwork made during workshops will be exhibited from Aug 6th - 19th at Maryland Hall.

We invite visitors to come and see the workshops being held on August 4th and 5th. The printing press will be stationed outside of the Eatery on our first floor, nestled in our Alcove galleries. There will be small sample wood-blocks that visitors can learn to use, and for just $2 take home their very own block print! Visitors will watch artists ink up their pre-carved wood blocks, handle paper, and learn how to use a professional printing press.

 

To find out more about BIG INK visit their website.

Local photographer Jay Fleming will be doing a book signing of his first book, "Working the Water" during our upcoming All That Art fundraiser.

Jay Fleming’s first book, “Working the Water,” is a visual narrative of the lives of those individuals whose livelihood is directly dependent upon the Chesapeake Bay — America’s largest estuary. The book comprises photographs of seasoned watermen, scenic seascapes, weathered workboats and bay bounty — a true and complete depiction of Chesapeake Bay life. Equal parts informative and aesthetically pleasing, Jay’s flagship book, “Working the Water" appeals to the seafood enthusiast, the history buff, the biologist, photography fan, and Chesapeake Bay lover alike.

Included in the live auction at All That Art will be a framed image of the cover of "Working the Water" titled "Broad Creek Oystermen." The piece retails for $1,200 and bidding starts at $500.

 Tickets to All That Art are $100 - purchase online here or call 410-263-5544.

Two additional businesses are offering coupons to Maryland Hall members starting May 1, 2017. 

Annebeth's will be offering 10% off one regularly-priced item and Evergreen Antiques & True Vintage will be offering 20% off one regularly-priced item. Coupons are emailed to members on the 1st of each month.

Click here to join or renew your membership today, enjoy benefits all year long, and support the life-changing arts activities Maryland Hall offers our community and its residents.

Gail Watkins, Color Canyon (2016)

Written by Janice F. Booth

Gail Hillow Watkins’s newest series of mixed media paintings, “Strata,” explores movement in simple, almost primitive terms.  The artist applies the technique she has been exploring for a decade,  layering and incising paint, paper, and various other material, but her focus now is on a narrative of motion, not a static uncovering, as in the 2013 series “Comics & Chromosomes.”  In some of these new works, simple forms leap and gyrate across the canvas bathed in color bands. The strata, seen together, become an undulating whole -- a dance troupe or a junkanoo parade.

With these new paintings, the viewer stands, a rapt observer, as the sands shift, light shimmers, and a curious sense of movement and motion begins. Since the lines of movement are contained in color bands, the dancing lines and the movement they suggest read like a choreographer’s notations.

Watkins’s kinetic forms evoke Henri Matisse’s work. Consider Matisse’s sinuous paintings, “Dance II,”  (1909-10) and  “The Dance” (1932-33).  In the earlier work, lines interconnect to create a sense of motion; colors, rich and deep, bathe the dancers in blue and coral. After twenty years of seeing and simplifying line and form, Matisse had eliminated all but the beauty of shapes against color to convey fluid motion.

 

Henri Matisse, Dance II  (1909-10) and  The Dance (1932-33)

Some of the works in “Strata” have a Caribbean flavor, perhaps inspired by Watkins’s travels in Cuba. Titles reflect Watkins’s Cuban memories -- “The Pink House,” “Malecon,” and “The Gate.” 

Inspiration for “The Pink House,” 2014, was the ubiquitous, tabby shell, stucco houses embedded with coquina shells seen everywhere in southern Florida and the Caribbean Islands. In this painting, bands of auburn, amaranth and cerise and carnelian reds, etched with shapes, bustle and tumble through and between the color bands, like figures in an apartment building, each with its own story and vitality. The colors and motion are playful rather than chaotic.

  

                                           Gail Watkins,  Malecon (2016)                            Gail Watkins,  Enlargement from Pink House (2014)

 

“Malecon,” 2016, seems a subtle rainbow of blues, pink, and bronze cascading down the canvas.  A lingering gaze rewards the viewer -- curving, arcing, reaching figures emerge from the bands of color, appearing as though from behind a curtain or from beneath the sea. In reality, the Malecon is an elegant esplanade in Havana with the sea’s tidal rhythms on one side, the ebb and flow of pedestrians and vehicles along the avenue.  The indigo and Turkish blue bands along the bottom of the painting suggest the Caribbean Sea, while along the top of the canvas striae incised into the blue band suggest Havana’s decorative grillwork against the blue sky.

Gail Watkins, The Gate (2016)

As we stand before the painting “The Gate,” 2016, we see a square of deep auburn banded with cornflower blue. The work is tranquil, a gate unused. “I saw a rusty gate at the entrance to a Havana Garden. It stuck with me – that lovely rust, the wild garden behind the gate, and always the sea and sky,”

Watkins revisits that sense of discovery from her “Chromosomes…” series with “Genome Fresco,” 2016.  But what is uncovered in this painting records not lost life-forms, but instead, some grand, civic event. Celebrants, dancers, participants all march and parade past the viewer, bearing up bands of vermillion and sapphire, rivers of color and ambiguous formations. The painting is playful and celebratory.

Gail Watkins, Genuine Fresco (2016)

Recently, Watkins’s works have eschewed the sensual pleasures of the Caribbean.  “Colour Canyon” and “Aleppo,” emerge from Watkins’s personal heritage and her response as an artist to the terrible war and suffering ongoing in the Middle East.  Watkins’s great-grandparents grew up in Aleppo, Syria, and left the city as newlyweds, settling in northern Lebanon.  The terrible images of death and ruin appearing nightly in newscasts and front pages across the world haunt us all, but evoke a particular pathos for Watkins. “Had they [her great-grandparents], as children, lived on those decimated streets? How did they feel as immigrants” What is my link to their past?” 

Movement, mystery, division come together in Watkins’s “Colour Canyon,” 2016, inspired by the artist’s trip to the Sinai Peninsula tracing part of her heritage. The muted golds, roses, and blues are separate forces, layered and resting one on another. Some of the bands reveal flowing, bulbous forms, some reveal very little. The unified painting suggests little motion, but a certain brooding potential.

Gail Watkins, Aleppo (2017)

“Aleppo,” 2017, is in stark contrast to most of the other pieces in this series. It is raw and still, dull gray and dusty tan, a band at the top the color of dried blood. And, on a ragged edge, a scrap of Persian blue, evoking a torn curtain or abandoned garment. Texture is central to this work; jagged, cracked, pockmarked.  There is no mistaking the visual impact – even without the work’s title.

Watkins’ work has, for the last decade, focused on uncovering what is hidden. Now, the work seems to step out into the light, conveying joy or suffering. There is no neutrality. What is revealed demands our attention.

AUTHOR BIO

Janice F. Booth is the author of Crofton: Images of America and has written for local, regional and national publications including What’s Up? Publications, American Artist, the Wildlife Art Journal, BizPeake Journal, and Lancaster Farming. Janice is an adjunct professor of English and Communications at Anne Arundel Community College, Arnold, Maryland, and has been an educator for over 40 years. She has a Master of Arts Degree from Wayne State University. Additionally. She can be contacted by email at janicebooth@verizon.net. Read her blog at www.open-line.org  

 

Enter the All That Art Raffle to win a custom pet portrait or a custom house portrait valued at $550.

Two winners will be chosen.
Raffle tickets are $50 each - o
nly 200 tickets will be sold!

Drawing: April 28 at All That Art at Maryland Hall 

Winners need not be present. Raffle winners each pick the portrait of their choice.

Portrait Option #1: Custom house portrait by artist Daniel Reismeyer

​Portrait Option #2: Custom pet portrait by artist Kimberly Minear

Click here to download an order form to enter the All That Art Raffle.

Click here for information about All That Art.

Daniel Reismeyer 

Daniel Riesmeyer is a representational painter and Adjunct Instructor currently teaching in Maryland. He received his B.F.A. from the Maryland Institute College of Art and M.F.A. from Indiana University, majoring in Painting. Artistically, Daniel is inspired by Art History and interested in the relationship between immediate perception and the transformation of those observations due to the transfiguring lens of memory, accumulated time, and the imagination. For examples of Daniel’s work, visit www.danielriesmeyer.com.

Kimberly Minear
Kimberly Minear is an abstract realism artist living in Annapolis, Maryland. She was born and raised in Little Rock, Arkansas, earning her Bachelor of Art in graphic design from the University of Arkansas Little Rock. Kimberly specializes in animal portraits in acrylics, and her newest works are created in collage. She fell in love with art in grade school after painting her first animal portrait. Kimberly has worked as a graphic designer, art director, and magazine publisher, and has come full circle to create art celebrating animals and nature. For examples of Kimberly’s work, visit www.kimberlyminear.com.

To purchase a raffle ticket, please fill out and return the order form located here or call 410-263-5544 ext, 10.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MHCA President Linnell Bowen (3rd from left) and members of the Severn Town Club (above) present a check for $35,000 to Maryland Hall.  The check represents the proceeds from the Club's 53rd annual Holly Ball which took place in November 2016.  The funds will support Maryland Hall's educational and artistic programs.  Thank you to the Severn Town Club and the more than 225 people who attended the ball for their support of Maryland Hall! 

Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts’ (MHCA) President and CEO Linnell Bowen has announced her retirement from MHCA effective June 30, 2017.    

Bowen will transition to a role with MHCA’s Capital Campaign--called The Campaign for Maryland Hall--a multi-year campaign to raise $18 million to modernize and expand Maryland Hall.

Maryland Hall’s Board has hired executive search firm Raffa (based in Washington, DC and Rockville) to assist in managing the transition and search process for a new President.  The search will be announced by the firm in mid to late February.  

Says Bowen of her many years at Maryland Hall and in the building:  “I loved Annapolis High School (my high school) and I loved teaching here in the 60’s. And I loved my past 21 years at the helm of Maryland Hall. Arts and education is my passion and we have accomplished great things together. The mission of Maryland Hall is so important and we look to the next CEO to continue the successes we’ve had. I thank all of our patrons for your past and on-going support of our mission and for all you’ve done to help make our organization the successful organization it is today!” 

“We have accomplished a lot in the past two decades,” she adds, “including restored theatre windows, new doors, turning a high school auditorium into an intimate concert hall, and last week, the groundbreaking for the first new construction on site since the building’s construction in 1932.  I am proud of all that we offer to the community through education, exhibits, and performances. We truly deliver Art for All!  I am happy to stay involved in the Capital Campaign but am ready to turn over the leadership of the organization to my successor and support whoever the Board selects for that position.” 

 

Read the article from the Capital Gazette: Maryland Hall president to retire after 21 years

Linnell Bowen sits in her office among some of her favorite pieces of local art and awards she has earned as president of Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts.

Her eyes moving around the room, she settles on one award in particular: The Arts Council of Anne Arundel County Annie Award for Lifetime Achievement.

Bowen received the reward in 2011, 15 years after starting her tenure as Maryland Hall president in 1996. Lifetime achievement awards are often given to people who have completed their work, but Bowen continued on in her position.

Now that will be coming to an end.

(Follow this link to continue reading)

Purchase a Young Patron membership during the month of February and receive an  additional young patron membership free to share with a friend. Learn more about Young Patron memberships and join today.


 

Young Patron Happy Hour

 

Maryland Hall is hosting a free happy hour in the galleries on Thursday, February 23rd from 5-7 pm. This is an opportunity to view artwork, learn more about the Young Patrons, and enjoy wine from Great Frogs Winery. 

RSVP to the FREE Happy Hour Here. Those who RSVP in advance will be entered to win admission for 1 to the Sip and Paint with Kim Hovell on Thursday, March 2nd at Maryland Hall. 

 

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